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If rent is over 14 days overdue a landlord may issue a notice to vacate

If a tenant is having trouble paying rent they should contact their landlord immediately to negotiate alternate arrangements to avoid being evicted, such as offering to pay by instalments.

If a tenant is having trouble paying rent they should contact their landlord immediately to negotiate alternate arrangements to avoid being evicted, such as offering to pay by instalments. VCAT may also order the tenant to enter into a repayment plan.

If a tenant’s rent is more than 14 days in arrears, the landlord can give a them a 14-day notice to vacate.

If a notice to vacate has been issued, the landlord can then apply to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal for a possession order to evict the tenant. The prisoner would have to send a representative to give evidence about repayments that the prisoner could make.

See Residential tenancy—Eviction for overdue rent or Residential tenancy—Notices to vacate.

Updated