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Aged care

Information about aged care in Victoria.

There are 3 different kinds of aged care provided by the Commonwealth Government:

  • residential care
  • home care
  • flexible care.

All residential care services must meet the minimum standards that are set out in the Quality Care Principles. These services are provided to older people who are in need of nursing or personal care. Before a person can access subsidised care they need to have their needs assessed by an Aged Care Assessment Service (ACAS). ACAS will make an assessment of the person's physical, medical, social and psychological needs. They will let the person know about their decision in writing.

These decisions can be reviewed by the Department of Health. An external review of this decision can be made by applying to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

See Aged Care Act 1997 (Cth)(opens in a new window) and Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Act 1997 (Cth).

Residential care

This care is for people who are no longer able to continue living independently in their own homes. People who are eligible for this care can be provided with accommodation, nursing and personal care according to their needs. It may take some time for this to happen as there are usually waiting periods.

See My Aged Care(opens in a new window).

Home care

A person wants to continue to live in their own home but who needs care to do so can get services like administration of medication, help with mobility, showering and personal hygiene, gardening, shopping, transport to doctor appointments and social activities.

See 'Help at home' in My Aged Care(opens in a new window).

Flexible care

This kind of care can be provided to a person either in their home or in residential care. These services have the potential to address needs in alternative ways to home care or residential care. They can assist people with special needs or those who are living in remote or rural areas.

The service may also assist people who need transitional care after a hospital stay. This kind of care can be provided as a temporary measure if a person is recovering from an illness or if they have had a fall.

See My Aged Care(opens in a new window).

Cost of care

Residential care

There may be some cost for aged care services. A person must pay a basic daily fee to cover the cost of cleaning, meals and laundry. The maximum fee that can be charged is 85% of the single rate of the aged pension. This is indexed to increase as the pension rate increases.

Depending on a person's income they may also be required to pay a care fee. This will depend on the income and assets of the person who needs aged care.

A further fee, the accommodation payment will be charged if the person has sufficient assets and income to meet these payments. If not, this cost will be covered by the government. This accommodation payment or contribution may be paid by:

  • daily payment
  • refundable deposit
  • combination of the above.

Extra fee may be charged for optional extras such as hairdressing or cable TV.

See Department of Social Services—Aged care fees and charges(opens in a new window).

Home care

The cost of home care will depend on the person's ability to pay. The assessment does not include the value of the person's family home.

See Department of Social Services—Aged care fees and charges(opens in a new window).

Complaints about aged care services

Internal resolution

A person in care, or their representatives may complain about the quality of the care that they are getting. All aged care providers must have a dispute resolution process to be used when they get complaints.

External resolution

Anyone can make a complaint to the Aged Care Complaints Scheme. External complaints are managed by the Aged Care Quality and Compliance section of the Department of Health.

Aged Care Complaints Commissioner

Complaints about the external resolution process can be made to the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner.

See:

For resources designed to assist Aboriginal people and for complaints information in other languages see:

More information

Legislation

Aged Care Act 1997 (Cth)

  • Part 3A.1—Resident and home care fees
  • s. 85-3—reasons for reviewable decisions
  • s. 85-4—reconsidering reviewable decisions

See Aged Care Act 1997 (Cth)(opens in a new window)

Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Act 1997 (Cth)

See Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Act 1997 (Cth).

Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Principles 2014 (Cth)

See Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Principles 2014 (Cth)(opens in a new window)

Reference

My Aged Care

This Commonwealth Government site has information for people who are thinking about aged care issues. The site includes a fee estimator to assess what the services may cost.

See My Aged Care(opens in a new window).

Elder Rights Advocacy

This organisation, funded by Commonwealth government, provides information and advocacy for people receiving aged care.

See Elder Rights Advocacy(opens in a new window).

Aged Care Complaints Commissioner

The Commissioner examines decisions made by the Aged Care Complaints Scheme about aged care service providers.

For resources designed to assist Aboriginal people and for complaints information in other languages see:

Department of Social Services

Note: Aged care has recently moved from the Department of Social Services to Department of Health. Information about aged care has not yet been moved from this department.

See Department of Social Services—Aged care fees and charges(opens in a new window).

Updated